HEALTH, Latest Post, Marijuana-Cannabis-Hemp

Legal cannabis must be option for pain sufferers, panelists say


He didn’t like the black market, so he cultivated at his home. He was arrested and received five years of probation.

HENDERSON – Advocates for medicinal marijuana said Tuesday the time is now to push for statewide legalization.

They said research is clear that cannabis helps those suffering from a variety of painful conditions, yet, the word marijuana is still taboo for many in society.

Jaime Montalvo deals daily with multiple sclerosis. After being diagnosed, the Louisville man discovered that cannabis improved his quality of life far more than anything else he’d tried.

He didn’t like the black market, so he cultivated at his home. He was arrested and received five years of probation.

“I lost custody of my son for six months, not for cultivation, but for testing positive,” Montalvo said. “So that’s what’s motivated me for the last six years or so, to change the laws and give people safe access to cannabis.”

Montalvo is a cannabis educator and director of KY4MM (Kentuckians for Medicinal Marijuana). He and others who took part in a panel discussion at Henderson Community College were preaching to the choir; most of the 50 or so in attendance seemed sympathetic to legalization.

The challenge, speakers said, is convincing state legislators.

Lawmakers in Kentucky and Indiana have legalized hemp oil, also known as CBD oil. But speakers said the positive impact of that is very small compared to what legal medicinal marijuana could do.

“You’re just really scratching the surface” with CBD oil, said Ashly Taylor, a Lexington native who is now a cannabis industry entrepreneur living in Colorado. “We’re looking to get legalization so we can help more people.”

Taylor, who used to work in the pharmaceutical industry, explained at Tuesday’s forum what a legalized marijuana industry would look like.

She said in a regulated market, all cannabis grown comes from state-licensed, taxpaying cultivation facilities, monitored from seed to sale.

All plants are tagged and entered into a state regulated tracking system.

They are processed at a state-licensed product manufacturing facility, with OSHA guidelines enforced and a staffed human resources department.

The product would pass testing from a state-licensed facility before being distributed for legal consumption.

“All of the things you see with other big industry, you’re going to see here,” Taylor said.

Legal medicinal marijuana “is not that new of a thing,” Taylor noted. It’s been legalized or decriminalized in a long list of countries, from Canada to Australia and many European countries.

It is legal in 30 states, and Taylor cited a shift in public opinion on the subject: 64 percent favorability according to one Gallup poll. She said those who support legalization show varied political bent.

Sympathy for legalization has reached local elected officials in Henderson. The City Commission recently passed a resolution stating support for medicinal marijuana.

Henderson City Commissioner Brad Staton said he and his colleagues were moved by testimony from many city residents, including a veteran with post-traumatic stress disorder who spoke about suicidal thoughts and depression.

“I didn’t think there was any way we would even take a vote much less pass it,” Staton said. “But we said we have people in the state of Kentucky who are suffering, and we can do something about it.” The vote was 5-0.

Forum speakers said cannabis helps with appetite and sleep, in addition to pain relief. They said the addiction potency is comparable to sugar.

A pharmacist in the audience asked the panelists about studies showing negative effects of long-time marijuana usage, and concerns about children’s usage.

Panelists said marijuana already is pervasive in the culture. Montalvo cited a study showing that in Kentucky, about 40 percent of teens have used marijuana.

“We need to decrease that,” he said. “In my opinion the way to decrease it is regulate the product and keep it out of the hands of children. Right now everybody is prohibited, but it’s still everywhere.”

Taylor said Kentucky authorities in 2016 seized and destroyed more than 560,000 plants, placing the state in the nation’s top five.

Kentucky that year spent $56.8 million for marijuana eradication.

“If we can take the money we save and do something better with it, it seems like a win-win to me,” Taylor said.

Grace Henderson would agree. The Henderson resident, an organizer of Tuesday’s forum, suffers from a list of chronic conditions, such as Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and Chron’s disease.

She’s on a list of medications which she said interact and cause other health problems.

Medical cannabis, she said, needs to be a option for people like her who, at times, struggle to simply get out of bed.

“We need a safe, viable alternative that does not kill people,” Henderson said. “And this is it.”

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More: City of Henderson backs medical cannabis resolution

More: Henderson woman tells how cannabis brings relief

Latest Post, Marijuana-Cannabis-Hemp

Proposal for legal medical marijuana held hostage by Kentucky House GOP leadership


Morgan Watkins, Louisville Courier Journal Published 3:20 p.m. ET March 20, 2018

Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes says legislation that would legalize medical marijuana is being held hostage by the state House of Representatives’ Republican leadership.

House Bill 166, which is sponsored by a bipartisan group of lawmakers, would let qualifying patients diagnosed with certain health conditions use medical marijuana, although limits would apply to patients and to the people and businesses growing and selling the drug.

The House Judiciary Committee heard testimony on HB 166 earlier this month but decided to pass over the proposal – a move that allows it to reconsider and rule on the matter later on in the 2018 session, which ends in mid-April. But the number of days during which the legislature can pass laws is dwindling.

“House Bill 166 continues to gain bipartisan support. One in four members of the House are now sponsors,” Grimes, a Democrat, wrote Tuesday afternoon in a post on her official Facebook page. “These legislators realize medical cannabis can help save lives and provide new funding to Kentucky so we don’t have to balance budgets on the backs of our teachers and public employees. Yet, GOP House Leadership is holding the bill hostage in the Judiciary Committee.”

Grimes wrote that the bill’s sponsors shouldn’t have to rely on a discharge petition – which can be filed in advance of an attempt to take a bill from a committee – in order to a force a vote on “something an overwhelming majority of Kentuckians support.”

“If the GOP House Leadership refuses to call a vote, constituents are only left to wonder what motivates them to ignore the will of the people,” she wrote.

State Rep. Joe Fischer, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, told Courier Journal the committee’s members already voted on HB 166 when they decided to pass over it.

Fischer said he would talk to committee members but noted that he hasn’t seen any amendments to the original bill, which did not have enough support to get a ‘yes’ vote from the group. As of 5 p.m. Tuesday, HB 166 wasn’t on the agenda for the committee’s Wednesday meeting, according to Fischer.

“I’ve been accused of holding it hostage, but there was a vote on it,” said Fischer, R-Fort Thomas. “Right now … it was to pass over the bill.”

Rep. Jason Nemes, R-Louisville, made the motion to pass over HB 166 on March 7. At the time, he said he wanted to help improve the measure and bring it back for consideration before the session ends. Since then, he has become a sponsor of the bill.

Grimes issued a separate statement last week that said the medical marijuana legislation had been revised. Jaime Montalvo, of the nonprofit organization Kentuckians for Medicinal Marijuana, said he has been working with sponsors of HB 166 and a substitute version of the bill is ready.

Rep. John Sims Jr., D-Flemingsburg, said he did file a discharge petition Tuesday, which was signed by 27 representatives.

“It’s an important bill that has lots of momentum throughout the whole state,” Sims said.

Discharge petitions can prompt the full chamber to vote on whether a committee has held a particular bill “for an unreasonable time,” according to the House’s procedural rules. (HB 166 was sent to the House Judiciary Committee for review in mid-January.)

If a majority of the House agrees a bill has been held too long, the legislation then can be released from that committee. That doesn’t guarantee it will be debated and voted upon by the full House, though.

House Speaker Pro Tem David Osborne, R-Prospect, said Grimes’ assertion that House leaders are holding medical marijuana legislation hostage is “absolutely not true” and suggested Grimes study up on the legislative process.

When asked if House leadership would be interested in bringing the medical marijuana bill to the floor of the chamber for a vote, Osborne said he’s sure they would take appropriate action if it were discharged from the committee.

On Wednesday afternoon, however, Sims — a key sponsor of the bill — said it’s highly likely HB 166 will die when the 2018 session officially ends next month.

“There’s not enough time left to get it through both chambers,” Sims said.

If the bill stalls out as Sims expects, he said legislation to legalize medical marijuana will be reintroduced when the legislature reconvenes next January for the 2019 session.

“We’re not giving up, and the fight will continue,” he said, noting the need to maintain the momentum that has built behind the push for medical marijuana in Kentucky.

Morgan Watkins: 502-582-4502; mwatkins@courierjournal.com; Twitter: @MorganWatkins. Support strong local journalism by subscribing today: www.courier-journal.com/morganw

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RELATED INFORMATION:

Kentuckians for Medicinal Marijuana

https://www.facebook.com/KY4MM/videos/1619057418129468/

https://www.facebook.com/KY4MM/videos/1617957748239435/

More information as it becomes available…

Latest Post, Marijuana-Cannabis-Hemp, SHEREEKRIDER

March 7, 2018 Today In Frankfort; Praying for HB 166 !


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As I sat here patiently waiting for the Kentucky Legislature to take a vote on HB 166, I was thinking of a way to say,

“Thank-You”

to ALL of the people who took a stand this year in Kentucky!

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Jaime Montalvo   Justin Lewandoski   Eric Michelle Crawford   Pat Dunegan   Jennifer Dunegan   Dan Seum   Sally Oh   Dan Malano Seum   Tony Ashley   Elihu Shepherd   Tim Simpson   Henry Fox   Gina Daugherty   Chad Wilson    Thomas Tony Vance    Rebecca Collins   Blackii Effing Whyte 

There are many more which have not been listed here! 

Remembering also those that have in past years took up this fight and were the leaders from the beginning!

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Gatewood Galbraith – Wikipedia   Galbraith supported the legalization of recreational marijuana use, arguing that the framers of the US Constitution “did not say we have a Constitutional right to possess alcohol. They said we have a Constitutional right to privacy in our homes, under which fits the possession of an extremely poisonous alcohol. Now this is the law in Kentucky today. In fact, it is these rulings that keep the Kentucky State Police from kicking down the doors of people possessing alcohol in Kentucky’s 77 ‘dry’ counties right now and hauling their butts off to jail. Now Marijuana is a demonstrably less harmful substance than alcohol and presents far less of threat to public welfare. So it also fits in a person’s right to privacy in their home. It’s beyond the police power of the state as long as I don’t sell it and it’s for my own personal use.”[10]

Craig Lee   Tony Adkins  Ron Moore  David Weigand   Angela Gatewood   Erin Grossman Vu  Robin Rider-Osborne   Paula Willett  Cher Ford-mccullough Brian McCullough  Mary Thomas-Spears  Lynne Wilson  Roland A. Duby   Hugh Yonn  Patrick Moore  

Again, I have missed so many names that should be listed here! 

Many people put their own lives on hold to take on Kentucky’s Cannabis battle, whether it be for medicinal, recreational or even palliative care, they all took a stand…and walked all the way to Frankfort to prove it.    Not literally, of course.  I hope they all had a decent ride to get there but surely there were a few old broken down cars in the parking lot as well.  But by the time they all left there yesterday evening it felt as though they had  literally walked those miles.

All different types of people working toward one cause – to get some kind of Cannabis reform into Kentucky!

At the end of the day, the vote for HB 166 was passed over!  A very disappointing outcome for many thousands of Kentuckians who very much needed that Bill to pass! 

How is it possible that legislation so favored by the citizens has not already become law? What is it about this legislation that has Kentucky’s legislators so scared that they are willing to buck the will of the majority of the citizens?
I am of course talking about the legalization of cannabis for medical uses. With 80% favorability and a multitude of benefits arising from the use of cannabis it is confounding to see the Assembly leadership refuse the will of the people and bury all cannabis bills in committee. For what purpose are they doing this?  LINK

When I first started posting to blogs about medical cannabis or “repeal prohibition” it was 2003.  That was 15 years ago.  By the time I became affiliated with the USMjParty it was 2005 and 2010 before I really became involved in any administration of the group.  I always fought for the repeal of prohibition as a whole, but most importantly for Cannabis because yes, I believe Cannabis is a medicine, but first it has to be recognized as a food or ‘herb’ that cannot be controlled by the U.N. or any Government entity!  It is our unalienable right to grow and use the plants that our “Creator” put here on this planet for us! Only commerce can be controlled by our Government, according to the Constitution.  Therefore what we grow on our property or consume in our homes is actually none of the Government’s business!  But they MADE it their business – a long time ago. 

To understand how they accomplished this takeover, you can read the “Elkhorn Manifesto” through this link.  That was the beginning of the downfall of the United States as we see it today.  The U.N. which was formed in 1945 with five founding members including the United States was the beginning of the NWO as we know it today.  The ONDCP and the 1961 Narcotic Convention as well as the 1970 Controlled Substance Act and the DEA instituted by Nixon, as a requirement of the 1970 CSA, as per the U.N., conveniently wrapped up our lives under the control of the NWO.  I wrote about this a couple of years ago and it has a lot of interesting links of information it that article.

The U.N. just issued a statement reminding all signatory Countries to be mindful of their “Treaties” regarding Marijuana.

Be mindful of the fact that it is not just Marijuana that they seek to control.  Control the food and medicine and you will control the people.

We are just now seeing how one world Government will work.  It is reaching into all facets of our lives, some not noticeable yet to the average person, not just whether or not Marijuana is “legal”. 

All of these things together, coupled with the fact that our Legislature has their own agenda for Kentucky influences the outcome of any Cannabis legislation being passed here. 

We still have a couple weeks to see what the outcome will be for the Citizens of Kentucky.  Will the hard work by our dedicated Activists pay off for the Patients who are in such need in our State?  We can only continue to pray and also continue calling

1-800-372-7181

and make sure your voice is heard!

As well, K.C.F.C. and others are gathering in Frankfort to show support.  You can follow them at this LINK.

There is a VERY good article documenting all of the Cannabis Bills in Kentucky this year at Kentucky Free Press.  If you haven’t already done so I encourage you to look at it.

Sally Oh,  who writes for Kentucky Free Press, was LIVE on Facebook on February 25th, explaining Medical Cannabis, States’ Rights & the Civil War  and I encourage you to view that video as well.

Sally Oh KY Free Press

Again, I want to thank everyone that has made an effort of any kind in Kentucky toward the repeal of Cannabis prohibition!  We all basically want the same thing – our patients to be taken care of and the freedom to possess, grow and consume a plant that our Creator blessed us with!

God Bless!

ShereeKrider

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http://www.kentucky.com/news/politics-government/article203965849.html?fb_action_ids=1613192325466378&fb_action_types=og.comments

https://www.facebook.com/kcfc2014/

https://www.facebook.com/thomas.t.vance/posts/1613192325466378:0

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Latest Post, Politics

Jaime Montalvo–Guest Editorial WDRB, Louisville, Ky.


Guest POV | Medical Marijuana

Posted: Jan 28, 2015 9:33 AM CST Updated: Jan 28, 2015 3:55 PM CST

WDRB Guest Editorial By Jaime Montalvo

 

I have Multiple Sclerosis. I’ve been fighting this disease for eight years.

I have muscle spasms, tremor uncontrollably, and I’m scared. Cannabis relieves these symptoms.

In Kentucky, thousands of Veterans suffer from PTSD and haven’t responded to treatment.

Sadly, too many choose suicide as a last resort for escaping their demons. I have personal combat veteran friends who testify that smoking Cannabis relieves them within seconds after waking up from horrendous nightmares.

Kentucky has the highest cancer death rate of all 50 states. You probably know someone who has had cancer. Cancer treatments also bring some of the most debilitating side effects. Twenty thousand Kentuckians a year face this diagnosis. Marijuana has been studied and proven to relieve these effects. The nausea brought about by chemotherapy is relieved within seconds of inhaling Cannabis.

The Epilepsy Foundation of Kentuckiana reports over 90,000 individuals suffer from epilepsy in our area. Like cancer treatments, medications used to manage seizures have debilitating side effects. Not every patient can tolerate the treatments, and the drugs often stop working. Cannabis oil has been heralded for decreasing certain patients’ seizures from 300 per week to zero or one.

Cannabis is helping us cope with our symptoms. Please help us by contacting your legislator at 800-372-7181 asking them to support medical marijuana legislation.

I’m Jaime Montalvo, founder of Kentuckians for Medicinal Marijuana, and that’s my point of view.

 

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