Fracking, Latest Post

STOP the F/G Fracking in Kentucky! Send the message now!


 

Governor Beshear, the General Assembly and the Energy and Environment Cabinet (EEC) are seeking comments on how the Commonwealth should move forward with regulating the oil and gas industry — including fracking. Around the country, fracking has been known to create toxic air pollution, contaminate drinking water and lead to health problems in communities near fracking sites.

 

¹ Tell Governor Beshear’s administration that regulations won’t protect the people of Kentucky from the consequences of fracking.

 

Fracking, formally known as hydraulic fracturing, is the destructive process of extracting oil and gas from deep underground by injecting millions of gallons of fracking fluids — a mixture of chemicals, water and sand — into a well at high pressure to crack open underground rock formations and release oil and gas.

Since the early 2000s, fracking has been growing rapidly across the country, producing massive volumes of toxic waste, causing accidents, leaks and spills that threaten drinking water, and releasing hazardous air pollution. It has also created explosion risks in homes, marred landscapes and fragmented forests, damaged roads with heavy truck traffic, and lowered property values. Take a stand against fracking in Kentucky.
Over the last six months, New York and Maryland both rejected moving forward with fracking after damning health reports showed that the health risks posed by fracking were too high. If it’s not safe in those states, then it’s not safe here, either.

Send a message to your lawmakers: Kentuckians don’t want to be part of an uncontrolled public health experiment.

Fracking isn’t safe for our communities, and it only prolongs our destructive reliance on fossil fuels. We can meet our energy needs with clean, renewable resources. Instead of spending time trying to regulate a polluting industry, the Governor, the General Assembly and the EEC should put their efforts into energy solutions that don’t poison human health, damage local economies or trash the environment.

 

Speak out and submit your comment against fracking today.

 

Thanks for taking action,

Renée Maas
Senior Southern Region Organizer
Food & Water Watch
rmaas(at)fwwatch(dot)org


1. Toward an understanding of the environmental and public health impacts of shale gas development: an analysis of the peer reviewed scientific literature, 2009-2014, PSE Health Energy, December 10, 2014.

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Fracking, Latest Post

What Is Fracking and Why Should It Be Banned?


 

https://i2.wp.com/www.foodandwaterwatch.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/FrackingWastePit_BGS_WEB.jpg

 

The case to ban fracking grows stronger every day. Fracking is short for hydraulic fracturing. It’s a water-intensive process where millions of gallons of fluid — a mix of water, sand, and chemicals, including ones known to cause cancer — are injected underground at high pressure to fracture the rock surrounding an oil or gas well. This releases extra oil and gas from the rock, so it can flow into the well.

But the process of fracking introduces additional industrial activity into communities beyond the well. Clearing land to build new access roads and new well sites, drilling and encasing the well, fracking the well and generating the waste, trucking in heavy equipment and materials and trucking out the vast amounts of toxic waste — all of these steps contribute to air and water pollution risks and devaluation of land that are turning our communities into sacrifice zones. Fracking threatens the air we breathe, the water we drink, the communities we love and the climate on which we all depend. That’s why over 250 communities in the U.S. have passed resolutions to stop fracking, and why Vermont, France and Bulgaria have stopped it.

Why a Ban? Can Regulations Make Fracking Safe?

Ban Fracking in Your Area

No. Fracking is inherently unsafe and we cannot rely on regulation to protect communities’ water, air and public health. The industry enjoys exemptions from key federal legislation protecting our air and water, thanks to aggressive lobbying and cozy relationships with our federal decision makers (the exemption from the Safe Drinking Water Act is often referred to as the Cheney or Halliburton Loophole, because it was negotiated by then-Vice President Dick Cheney with Congress in 2005). Plus, the industry is aggressively clamping down on local and state efforts to regulate fracking by buying influence and even bringing lawsuits to stop them from being implemented. That’s why fracking can’t be made safe through government oversight or regulations. An all out ban on fracking is the only way to protect our communities.

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