Latest Post

Kentucky on verge of lifting nuclear moratorium


Image result for kentucky nuclear waste site

James Bruggers , @jbruggers 10:23 a.m. ET March 8, 2017

Nuclear critic says no nuclear power plants will likely come to Kentucky any time soon because of their costs

A bill that would overturn a three-decade-old law that effectively bars construction of nuclear power plants in Kentucky is on the verge of passing the General Assembly and being sent to Gov. Matt Bevin for his signature.

Senate Bill 11 would get rid of a mandate that any nuclear power plants have access to a permanent disposal facility for their radioactive wastes, which can remain dangerous for hundreds of thousands of years. They’d only have to have a plan to manage those wastes.

Already successfully through the Senate, Sen. Danny Carroll‘s bill passed a House committee on Tuesday and was sent to the House floor for a vote, where one of its long-time critics, Kentucky Resources Council director Tom FitzGerald, said he expects it will pass.

“We’ve had 15 years of arguing over this,” FitzGerald said Wednesday, observing that his organization withdrew its opposition this year as new wording was added to make sure all costs of nuclear energy would be weighed before allowing any plants to be constructed in Kentucky.

He said there was little chance of a nuclear plant being built in Kentucky anytime soon because they cannot compete economically with other forms of energy such as natural gas, scrubbed coal or renewables.

►MORE:  Bevin, 18 states, call for EPA to back off

Still, Carroll, a Paducah Republican, whose district includes a former nuclear fuel factory in Paducah, said Kentucky needs to be ready to diversify its energy portfolio.

In a news release, he said that U.S. energy demand is expected to increase. “That means the United States will need many new power plants of all types to meet the increased demand and replace older facilities that are retired. To ensure a diverse portfolio, many of these new power plants will have to be nuclear,” he said.

FitzGerarld said it’s more likely that the bill might allow the Paducah facility — which will be in a cleanup mode for many decades — to attract some additional research and development money to Kentucky.

Despite spending billions of dollars over two decades, the U.S. government failed to open a permanent disposal facility for high-level nuclear waste at its Yucca Mountain site in Nevada.

Reach reporter James Bruggers at 502-582-4645 or at jbruggers@courier-journal.com.

CONTINUE READING…

Status

Spectrum: Partisan Bill (Republican 3-0)
Status: Engrossed on March 2 2017 – 50% progression
Action: 2017-03-07 – reported favorably, 1st reading, to Calendar
Text: Latest bill text (Draft #2) [PDF]

Summary

Amend KRS 278.600 to require that nuclear power facilities have a plan for the storage of nuclear waste rather than a means of permanent disposal and to add definitions of “storage,” “low-level nuclear waste,” and “mixed nuclear waste”; amend KRS 278.610 to allow certification if the facility and its plans for waste storage are approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission; eliminate the requirement that the facility have a plan for disposal of high-level nuclear waste; eliminate the requirement that cost of waste disposal be known; eliminate the requirement that the facility have adequate capacity to contain waste; give the Public Service Commission authority to hire a consultant to perform duties relating to nuclear facility certification; prohibit construction of low-level nuclear waste disposal sites in Kentucky except as provided in KRS 211.852; direct the Energy and Environment Cabinet to review regulations required for permitting nuclear facilities and report to LRC; repeal KRS 278.605, relating to construction of nuclear power facilities.

CONTINUE TO SB11 …

Latest Post, Water

America’s hidden water affordability crisis


leaky-faucet

 

By Ciara O’Rourke on Mar 5, 2017 6:00 am

When Elizabeth Mack wondered about a future in which Americans wouldn’t be able to pay for water, a couple of colleagues waved her off. “Don’t be ridiculous,” they said. But the idea niggled at Mack, an assistant professor at the Department of Geography, Environment, and Spatial Sciences at Michigan State University. And in January, in an article published in the science journal PLOS ONE, she asked a new question: Is there a burgeoning water affordability crisis in the United States?

Mack, along with research assistant Sarah Wrase, determined that if water rates increase at projected amounts over the next five years, the percentage of households that can’t pay their water bills could triple from 11.9 percent to more than a third. Nearly 14 million households nationwide already struggle to afford water services. An additional 27.18 million — or 8.5 percent of the country’s population — could soon face the same challenges.

“I don’t think we think about this, about what it would mean to not have running water,” Mack told Fusion. Of course, some Americans have experienced it. Water affordability is becoming an increasingly critical issue in cities across the country, including Philadelphia, Atlanta, Seattle, and Detroit. In Philadelphia, an estimated four out of 10 water accounts are past due. Atlanta and Seattle have some of the highest water rates in the country. And in Detroit, a campaign to cut off delinquent residents has stopped water and sewage service for 50,000 households since 2014. It’s a reality Mack thinks Americans in other parts of the country could face.

“Any place with shrinking city characteristics, any city where we have a hollowing out of a downtown core that used to be quite vibrant” could be in trouble, she said. That’s the case in Detroit, where a declining population has left fewer households to shoulder the costs of water services.

The cost of replacing water systems built around World War II are projected at more than $1 trillion over the next 25 years across the country. Prices will be even higher if cities tap private companies to provide water services because they tend to charge higher rates than public providers. A majority of Americans get their water from public providers, but in Atlanta, where the privatization of water services in part drove up water expenses, the service costs $325.52 per month. Households must make at least about $87,000 for that to be affordable.

Because public utilities can only charge customers as much money as it takes to recoup their costs, Mack said, it can be harder for them to finance new infrastructure — but their rates also tend to be lower than private providers that don’t have the same constraints. Still, a 2014 report by Corporate Accountability International and Public Services International Research Unit questioned whether it’s appropriate to tap private companies to shore up infrastructure projects. “No matter how the private sector frames its intentions, its priority is market development over community development, profit maximization over the public interest,” the report states.

Other drivers behind rising water prices include increasingly rigorous water quality standards, said Laura Feinstein, a senior research associate at the Pacific Institute, a global water think tank based in Oakland. As federal laws are updated to reflect new contaminants, water utilities have to spend more money to treat the water to keep it safe for consumers. Extreme weather events associated with climate change, such as droughts and floods, are also expensive for the systems to manage.

But there are ways for both providers and people to curb costs, she said. As utilities look for new water sources to accommodate population growth, they can turn to storm water capture or gray water reuse instead of costlier dams, reservoirs, and desalination plants. And utilities should be mindful that per capita water use doesn’t necessarily increase as populations do thanks to more efficient appliances and cultural shifts among residents who might water their lawns less.

“In reality, per person water use just keeps going down over time, at least in California,” Feinstein said.

Some utilities have worked to develop effective bill discount programs to focus their efficiency programs on lower-income customers. Offering a rebate for a low-flush toilet, for example, is only an option for people who can already pay for a big investment like that, Feinstein said. But giving customers a discount upfront makes it more affordable.

Water affordability is already a serious challenge for low-income people in the United States, Feinstein said. In one study that looked at a sample of communities in California, the institute found that about 5 percent of households had incomes under $10,000 and were spending around 5 percent of their income on water.

In California, at least, laws restraining public utilities from hiking rates higher than the cost of recovery can also hamper efforts to offer discounts to low-income customers, Feinstein said, “because they can’t charge more affluent customers a little more in order to fund low-income discounts.”

For people already living in poverty — 40 percent of the population in Detroit — any increase in a water cost will strain a family’s finances, said Randy Block, director of the Michigan Unitarian Universalist Social Justice Network. He and others in the faith community are trying to raise money to help needy residents pay for water. He thinks water should be recognized as a human right in Michigan just as the United Nations General Assembly defined it in 2010. He likened the city shutting off water for delinquent customers to a war on poverty, and he believes similar skirmishes will play out across the country as income inequality grows.

“Detroit is the canary in a coal mine,” Block said.

Mark Fancher, an attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Michigan, said unaffordable water has been a “pretty massive problem” in Detroit for 10–15 years. The practical result of shut-offs, he said, is residents relocating. While there are hardship extensions for residents who have fallen behind on their bills but are also suffering from a serious medical condition, according to Fancher, the system could be a lot better: Residents often don’t know about it, or their applications are denied. Other times, they might receive bills for water they didn’t use or not get the bills at all, he said.

“The argument has been made that an affordability plan for the city of Detroit would be a really helpful thing for the struggling utility,” Fancher said. “Because even though people who take advantage of it may not be paying full market rate for water, they’ll be paying more than nothing, which will at least bring in some significant amount of money that right now they’re not getting at all.”

He questioned how seriously the city is interested in water affordability. The Detroit Water and Sewerage Department did not respond to questions about water affordability and shut-offs in the city, but The Detroit News reported last month that officials expect a new rate structure that rewards low water use will reduce the burden on low-income residents. In turn, said Marcus Hudson, the department’s chief financial officer, their probability of paying will increase.

Mack thinks that governments, utilities, and consumers will need to work together to solve the growing problem of water affordability.

“How can we fix this infrastructure and how can we finance it together?” she said. She cautions against alarmist responses to her study, which, she said, “is not meant to be an activist piece.” Rather, she said her research highlights a quiet water crisis that many Americans are aware of in developing countries but don’t consider in the United States. She doesn’t think anyone appreciates the scope of infrastructure problems here and, she said, Americans should be watching Detroit warily.

“I would hazard a guess that most people don’t know how much water they use,” she said. “I’d encourage them to do some self-education.”

Feinstein is agnostic on whether it’s an increasing problem. The article, leaning on the Environmental Protection Agency’s average consumption estimates, assumes the average household uses 12,000 gallons per month. “That might be more than people really need to meet their basic needs,” she said.

But she agrees that water affordability is a problem. Other countries, such as France, Australia, and South Africa have better programs in place to make sure low-income residents can pay for water, Feinstein said. She thinks California is leading the way with legislation that calls for the State Water Resources Control Board to study how to develop low-income assistance rates statewide. As far as she knows, it would be the first such program of its kind if it’s implemented but, she said, it should be nationwide.

“When people don’t have access to the water that they need, it compromises their health. It means they end up having to make choices between paying for things like medical care and paying for food and paying for water,” Feinstein said. “Water is essential for life. People should be able to get the water they need a price they can afford it.”

CONTINUE READING…

Latest Post

This is the story of the FDA’s persecution of Samuel Girod.


When Government Fails In Kentucky

By Sally Oh on March 1, 2017 | Comments 2 | Affiliate Disclosure

Here’s a video explaining the entire thing, transcript with links below.

Let’s be clear about a couple of pertinent facts:

1. The FDA made up arbitrary rules, then accused Sam of breaking those rules.

2. There are no victims. Samuel Girod has hurt no one.

3. FDA-approved pharmaceutical drugs kill 1 person every 19 minutes. Merck’s FDA-approved Vioxx killed over 68,000 people. Nobody in Big Pharma goes to jail. They pay out billions in fines (after making billions in profits.) No companies close, nobody goes to jail. Nobody. Even after killing and harming 100s of thousands of people.

4. Sam Girod and his products have hurt no one.

The Story of the FDA v Samuel Girod

Samuel Girod and his family have been making and selling 3 all-natural herbal products for nearly 20 years. In all those…

View original post 427 more words

HEALTH, Latest Post

In chaotic scene, Rand Paul demands to see the House GOP’s Obamacare repeal bill


By Lauren Fox and Phil Mattingly, CNN

Updated 3:25 PM ET, Thu March 2, 2017

Rand Paul 3.2.17

Senator demands to see ‘secret’ Obamacare bill 01:59

Story highlights
  • Some House Republicans were being granted a chance to review an Obamacare repeal draft
  • GOP leadership has taken a new level of caution with their Obamacare legislation

(CNN)  Kentucky Republican Sen. Rand Paul marched to the House side of the Capitol Thursday morning, knocked on a locked door and demanded to see a copy of the House’s bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, which he believed was being kept under lock and key.

Aides in the room told the senator — before dozens of reporters in a crowded hallway — that there was no bill to see. In fact, it wasn’t the room where GOP members of the Energy and Commerce Committee were told to meet with staff to review the current draft of their bill at all. But that did little to dissuade Paul, openly critical to the House Republican leadership’s preferred path on the process, from making his underlying point.

“This should be an open and transparent process,” Paul said. “This is being presented as if it were a national secret, as if this was a plot to invade another country, as if this were national security. That’s wrong.”

    Paul ventured to the House Thursday afternoon after reports surfaced that House Republicans on the Energy and Commerce Committee were being granted an opportunity to review the current draft of the Obamacare repeal legislation and ask questions behind closed doors.

    Opposed to the House legislation’s principles, Paul said he wanted to see the bill himself even though he didn’t serve on the committee.

    “I’m not allowed to read the working product so I can comment on it?” he said.

    Outside the small House office, the chaotic scene continued with a handful of Democrats demanding they, too, see the legislation, which aides continued to say was not even in the room. Two Democrats on the Energy and Commerce Committee and House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, a Democrat from Maryland, asked aides if the bill was ready, only to be rebuffed.

    “I want to see the bill. I want to read the bill,” New York Democrat Paul Tonko said, noting that as far as he knew, Republicans were still planning to move forward with a markup on the legislation next week.

    At one point, the GOP staff allowed Hoyer, Rep. Joe Kennedy and a dozen or so reporters into the room to inspect it themselves. It was, in fact, bill-less.

    Hoyer proceeded to hold an impromptu news conference near a bust of President Abraham Lincoln a few feet away from the misidentified room. He then held an imaginary conversation with the 16th president about what Hoyer said was the poor state of the Republican Party.

    Rep. Greg Walden, the chairman of the Energy and Commerce Committee, downplayed perceptions of secrecy in a statement Thursday.

    “Reports that the Energy and Commerce Committee is doing anything other than the regular process of keeping its members up to speed on latest developments in its jurisdictions are false. Simply put, Energy and Commerce majority members and staff are continuing to discuss and refine draft legislative language on issues under our committee’s jurisdiction.”

    Leadership has taken a new level of caution with Obamacare repeal and replace reconciliation drafts after a leaked version of the bill in progress was circulated to news outlets last week.

    House aides told CNN that the review process was simply part of regular procedure of giving their members an opportunity to review the current draft and ask committee staff questions. The committee — along with a second panel responsible for the repeal legislation — is tentatively shooting to consider their respective pieces of legislation as soon as next week.

    The leaked draft — which aides say was outdated — drew condemnations from conservatives who pledged to oppose any final bill and set off a new round of internal divisions that threatened to endanger the repeal process before it even gets off the ground.

    CONTINUE READING AND TO VIDEO…

    Latest Post

    Kentucky Regulators, Industry Reps Privately Rewrote Coal Ash Rules


    By Erica Peterson

    https://i2.wp.com/wfpl.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/Mill_Creek2.jpg

    Kentucky’s Energy and Environment Cabinet has finalized a controversial plan to let the state’s utilities virtually self-regulate the storing of hazardous coal ash near power plants.

    As details about the plan emerged over the past few weeks, Cabinet Secretary Charles Snavely defended the rules and the process, saying it included “full public participation.”

    But documents obtained by WFPL News show the process was far from public and instead included more than a year of backroom meetings — under both former Gov. Steve Beshear and Gov. Matt Bevin — with representatives of the utility industry. During that time, documents show the regulations were significantly revised and weakened.

    When regulators began meeting with representatives of the utility industry in September 2015, the regulations they had drafted (left) were extensive. By the time they submitted the drafts to the Legislative Research Commission in October 2016 (right), the regulations were weakened.

    Environmental attorney Tom FitzGerald of the Kentucky Resources Council, who has spent more than 44 years working in the state, and oftentimes on workgroups with members of industry and regulators to craft regulations, said to his knowledge, such one-sided input from industry is unprecedented in recent years.

    “I think it’s unconscionable, and I think it does not reflect well on how little value [the regulators] place on public involvement in the development of regulations that are intended to protect the public,” FitzGerald said.

    Representatives from the Energy and Environment Cabinet declined an interview request. In response to emailed questions, spokesman John Mura defended the cabinet’s regulatory process.

    “As a part of the pre-KRS 13A deliberative process of regulation development, it is common for the state to informally discuss regulatory matters with the regulated sector that are directly impacted by those regulations,” Mura wrote.

    He also pointed to a public comment period and a public hearing held in November 2016. After public comments were received, the agency made minor changes to the rule.

    Dangers of Coal Ash

    Coal ash — also called “coal combustion residuals,” or CCR — is the byproduct of burning coal for electricity. It’s often stored in dry landfills or wet ponds, or recycled into products like concrete or wall boards.

    But it also contains contaminants like mercury, cadmium and arsenic. And environmental advocates say that’s why it’s so important there’s adequate state and federal oversight over coal ash disposal.

    “Coal ash is a toxic substance that if handled incorrectly can take human lives, can make people sick, can ruin the environment, lakes, rivers, streams, permanently,” said Earthjustice attorney Lisa Evans.

    In the past decade, there have been two high-profile instances — in Kingston, Tennesee and Eden, North Carolina — where large-scale coal ash spills have contaminated miles of rivers and land. But there have also been numerous other cases where there have been smaller amounts of pollution, where coal ash has caused air problems or has leached chemicals into groundwater.

    Kentucky Division of Waste Management geologist Todd Hendricks mentioned a few of those instances in public comments he made about the cabinet’s proposed coal ash rule:

    “Analysis of groundwater and leachate from CCR units in Kentucky has shown elevated levels of heavy metals, sulfate, boron, and other contaminants. One facility is conducting groundwater corrective action for contamination of karst springs with arsenic leaching from an inactive surface impoundment. Hundreds of thousands of gallons of arsenic-contaminated groundwater per day are captured and pumped to the active surface impoundment for dilution and discharge through a permitted outfall. At another facility, state laboratory analysis of one recent sample of fluid (presumably leachate) flowing from the toe of a closed CCR landfill showed 9.81 mg/L of arsenic, which is 981 times the maximum contaminant level (MCL).”

    Coal ash wasn’t regulated by the federal Environmental Protection Agency until 2015. But with the publication of the first-ever federal coal ash rules in the Federal Register, the EPA set out new standards designed to be incorporated into states’ existing regulatory framework.

    And that’s when the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet began working on the state’s version of the regulations.

    Emails Show Industry-State Meetings

    By its own admission, the Kentucky Division of Waste Management spent more than 1,600 hours working on the regulation in 2015, under former governor Steve Beshear.

    On Sept. 3, 2015, regulators sat down with representatives from Kentucky’s utility industry. They screened a PowerPoint presentation on the current draft version of the rules. And on the 12th slide, regulators told the utility representatives that their facilities would no longer be able to qualify for a program called a “permit-by-rule” for coal ash sites. Instead, they would have to stop accepting coal ash into their landfills and ponds by Oct. 19, 2015, or get a permit for disposal.

    That wasn’t the last meeting between regulators and industry representatives to discuss the coal ash rules. Emails obtained through an open records request show they met in person at least three more times — in October 2015, and April and June 2016.

    State regulators shared drafts of the regulations with Tom Shaw, the environmental director of Big Rivers Electric Corporation, and Jack Bender, the attorney representing the Utility Information Exchange of Kentucky, an industry group. And both men sent regulators UIEK’s comments on the proposals multiple times, months before the agency took comments from the public.

    Bender declined a request for additional comment, and Shaw didn’t respond to a voicemail message.

    When regulators went into that meeting on Sept. 3, 2015, the draft CCR rules were extensive. They covered groundwater monitoring, inspections, technical specifications for recycling coal ash and plans for closing facilities.

    But by the time the draft regulations were released to the public in October 2016, they didn’t contain any of those specifics. And the regulations proposed regulating the electric utilities with a “permit-by-rule” — the very mechanism that the state declared it would not use during that September meeting.

    Oversight Steps for Coal Ash Removed

    In the proposal released to the public in October, electric utilities wouldn’t have to apply with the state for a permit to build a landfill or pond for coal ash. Instead, the state determined the utilities would have a “permit-by-rule” and could begin constructing coal ash units without prior permitting or review by state regulators.

    Right now, utilities building coal ash units need a permit from the Kentucky Division of Waste Management. The process sometimes takes years and involves professional engineers, geologists and environmental technicians. Often permits are also needed from the Kentucky Division of Water.

    Under the new proposal, those wouldn’t be necessary.

    The state’s approach has been modified somewhat in the final version to a “registered permit-by-rule.” This means utilities will have to register before they begin construction of landfills or ponds, but there will still not be a rigorous permitting process.

    “It’s the Wild West, basically,” FitzGerald said. “You get to characterize [the project] on your own, if you do at all, you get to manage it at the location you decide, you get to control the design, the construction, the operation, the closure, the post-closure. And the only time the state is going to become involved is after you screw up. If they find out about it.”

    FitzGerald said skipping a rigorous permit review process — where the utility and regulators work together to design the project — could pose myriad problems.

    If groundwater monitors aren’t put in the correct locations, they might not detect water pollution. Sensitive ecological or historical sites — like Wentworth Cave on Louisville Gas and Electric’s Trimble County property — could be buried under coal ash forever.

    Or, in the most extreme cases, an engineering error could lead to structural flaws in a project and result in a catastrophic coal ash spill.

    Cabinet spokesman Mura wrote in an email that the state’s end product is an attempt to comply with the federal rules.

    “It was the Obama EPA, after a lengthy regulation development process, that promulgated an industry self-implementing program with no permitting program and with the public/state involvement process done via posting of information on industry website(s),” Mura said.

    The EPA’s rules were self-implementing but intended to be incorporated into a state’s existing framework. More recently, Congress approved the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation (WIIN) Act, which directs states to work the new federal standards into existing permitting programs.

    Legal Challenges Possible

    It’s not illegal for regulators to consult with industry representatives before a draft regulation is released for public comment.

    Instead, the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet routinely seeks input from so-called stakeholders early in the process. But usually that input includes people on different sides of the issue — not just industry representatives but also people from environmental groups, landowners and others with a stake in how the regulations play out,

    FitzGerald said that kind of approach — where all sides are engaged early on in the process — ensures that when the regulations are released for public comment, multiple perspectives have been taken into account.

    “It is far preferable and I think much more productive and you get a much more responsible work product when you have input from all of the stakeholders,” he said. “And yet in this case, the input came solely from the regulated industry. And the result was a serial weakening of a responsible approach into one that I think is the most irresponsible approach I have seen in my 44 years of working on these issues on behalf of the public.”

    Before the rule is finalized, it will need approval from two legislative committees. FitzGerald said if it wins approval, he might consider seeking judicial review.

    CONTINUE READING AND TO AUDIO!

    Latest Post, Marijuana-Cannabis-Hemp

    Sen. Morgan McGarvey Hosting Public Mtg RE: Medical Marijuana (KY) on February 18th in Louisville, Kentucky


    _JE_b292

     

     

    Senator Morgan McGarvey Hosting 2/18 Public Meeting

    Legalize Kentucky Supporters:

    Sen. McGarvey filed a bill to allow medical marijuana in last year’s Legislative session and is expected to do so again this year. We need to get a huge crowd to attend this Saturday to thank him for his past support, and show him there are still many supporters of this important issue!

    Here is the information: 

    Senator Morgan McGarvey

    Public Meeting

    10 AM

    Saturday, February 18

    Douglass Community Center

    2305 Douglass Blvd

    Latest Post, ShereeKrider

    Happy Birthday Daddy!


    In memoriam, for my Father…

    Mom Dad 1941

    Above:  Kenneth Eugene Hardesty and Marie Nelson Hardesty 1941

    Kenneth Eugene Hardesty was born February 10, 1917 in Irvington, Kentucky.

    He was enlisted October 10, 1941 out of Jefferson County, Kentucky and  Served in New Guinea, Southern Philippines (liberation); Luzon.

    He received an Asiatic Pacific Theater Ribbon with (3) Bronze Stars, a Good Conduct Ribbon, and American Theater Ribbon and Philippine Liberation, Victory Medal WWII.

    He served as a Private First Class for over four years until he was discharged at the end of the war.

    And then he came home and had me…In the baby boomer years!

    For this I thank him and my Mother who so tirelessly worked to take care of me.

    I will remember you and celebrate this day,

    and I hope You will too, gathered with friends and family who have long since left this Earth,

    For this is your 100th Birthday! 

    A day that comes only once, and would not come in a time that we could celebrate together. 

    But I will remember you forever!

    May God Bless You Both where ever you are – I know you are in Heaven!

    For all the love and hard work that you and Mom put into having and raising me,

    I remember your birthdays, each and every year, even though you are not here to celebrate them with.

    I will love you forever!

    SHk

    Abuse, Justice, Latest Post

    We, the people of America, demand reform of ; Kentucky Cabinet for Families and Children


    Among Bevin’s campaign pledges was that he would reform the cabinet’s social services agency.

    By:  Robin Rider-Osborne·Sunday, January 31, 2016

    KENTUCKY REPRESENTATIVE EMAIL ADDRESSES AND ANNOUNCEMENT LETTER / ALL STATE PARTICIPATION. Copy and paste letter to email addresses listed below; Bulk email dump at bottom of page for one letter bulk sending.

    We, the people of America, demand reform of ; Kentucky Cabinet for Families and Children & Family Law courtrooms. I request of your office the following;

    1. Implement removal of Abusers, not children from Family units.

    2. Remove Immunity for Kentucky Cabinet for Families and Children workers.

    3. Restructure Family Law court into budget cutting mediation forums of two party negotiations.

    4. Redirect Family Law Criminal allegations into Criminal court.

    5. Restrict Judges and various interpretations of Family Law codes to abuse either party.

    6. End Kentucky Cabinet for Families and Children abuse and Family Law abuse against the people of Kentucky. We demand an end to wasteful spending on agencies devastating families financially.

    7 Allow a Jury trial in Termination of Parental Rights Cases

    8. Amend or repeal that law that allows for children being removed due to disability and termination of rights without working towards reunification.

    9. Release records upon request without redaction and revamp the Ombudsman to process the complaints in a timely and proper manner.

    10. Revamp Foster Care Review boards as originally spelled out in CAPTA.

    I cite the cases of ;

    Pike Co. Circuit Judge Steve Combs DUI,

    Garrard Co. Judge Ronnie Lane Drug trafficking,

    Russell Co. Judge R. Maricle illegally distributing prescription drugs,

    Judge Charles Huffman Extortion,

    Russell Co. Judge Executive Kent Clark, Alcohol related charges,

    Judge Executive Joe Grieshop charged with third-degree burglary; theft of items valued at over $10,000; 10 counts of retaliating against participants in a legal process; and one count of official misconduct,

    Knox Co. Judge executive Raymond Smith(deceased)Attempted murder of Robin Smith, Murder of Mychael Smith and Micheal Smith,

    Warren Co. Judge Margaret Huddleston DUI,

    Marshall Co. Judge Executive Mike Miller, False entry/unauthorized act, .

    This partial list of neglect of office, unethical professional conduct and evidence of failure within the Judicial branch of Kentucky. We strongly oppose Judges overseeing Families in crisis in the Family law division.

    I cite the case of the failure of Kentucky Cabinet of Families and Children in protecting a nine year old, Amy from her adoptive siblings, known to have history in sexual abuse and undisclosed by the KCFC prior to the adoption. Problems were reported to indicate the adoptive parent, Kimberly Dye desire to ‘return’ the adopted girl shortly before her death This was an enormous failure of several to ignore all the warning signs of this broken adoptive home. While we acknowledge review and actions were taken as the result of the death of this girl, we feel more can be done to insure the safety of children seized and accountability by this agency.

    We know there is rampant corruption in the government offices of Child services and Family law. This is a national epidemic of criminal activity within the programs, courtrooms and agencies that are bankrupting the American Families. We demand reform and strict laws on government seats of power placed with the power of office to seize children, financially destroy individuals, and racketeering to conceal internal corruption within our state and federal offices.

    End legal abuse by Judges and Lawyers by instituting forums for successful dissolution/custody between spouses with guidelines without ruling Judges or lawyers. Enforce penalty of perjury, redirect criminal actions in Family Law to the Criminal courts. Remove immunity for Judges operating outside the rule of law. Reform Child services to an efficient team of child crime investigators and not our out dated model of Child protective services.

    We, the people, unite and demand reform of CPS agencies and Family Law practices. We, the people, take back our rights to protect our children and families.

    Robin Rider-Osborne can be contacted at:

    Citizens Investigating the “Runaway Cabinet of Kentucky” Task Force

    and by email to:  MercedesMcSweeney@gmail.com

    Thank You for your attention in this matter!

    EMAIL LINKS (EMAIL BULK DUMP AT BOTTOM OF PAGE / WINDOWS LINK EMAILS BELOW SITE LINKS. COPY /CUT PASTE LETTER BODY INTO EACH EMAIL LINK. NOT ALL REPRESENTATIVES PROVIDE EMAIL ADDRESSES.

    BULK EMAIL DUMP / ONE SENDER; ONE EMAIL

    Julian.Carroll@lrc.ky.gov;Bob.DeWeese@lrc.ky.gov;Ron.Crimm@lrc.ky.gov;Robert.Damron@lrc.ky.gov;Jim.DeCesare@lrc.ky.gov; Tom.McKee@lrc.ky.gov;MaryLou.Marzian@lrc.ky.gov;Jimmie.Lee@lrc.ky.gov; Jeff.Greer@lrc.ky.gov; Keith.Hall@lrc.ky.gov; Jim.Glenn@lrc.ky.gov; Jim.Gooch@lrc.ky.gov; Arnold.Simpson@lrc.ky.gov; Sal.Santoro@lrc.ky.gov; Tom.Riner@lrc.ky.gov; Marie.Rader@lrc.ky.gov; Rick.Rand@lrc.ky.gov; Tim.Moore@lrc.ky.gov; Richard.Heath@lrc.ky.gov; Richard.Henderson@lrc.ky.gov; Rick.Nelson@lrc.ky.gov; Charlie.Miller@lrc.ky.gov; Terry.Mills@lrc.ky.gov; Thomas.Kerr@lrc.ky.gov; kim.king@lrc.ky.gov; MarthaJane.King@lrc.ky.gov; Adam.Koenig@lrc.ky.gov; David.Osborne@lrc.ky.gov; RuthAnn.Palumbo@lrc.ky.gov; Joni.Jenkins@lrc.ky.gov; james.kay@lrc.ky.gov; sannie.overly@lrc.ky.gov; Jeff.Hoover@lrc.ky.gov; Dennis.Horlander@lrc.ky.gov; Jody.Richards@lrc.ky.gov; jill.york@lrc.ky.gov; Jimmy.Higdon@lrc.ky.gov; sara.gregory@lrc.ky.gov; Johnny.Bell@lrc.ky.gov; Kevin.Bratcher@lrc.ky.gov; Regina.Bunch@lrc.ky.gov; Robin.Webb@lrc.ky.gov; Robert.Stivers@lrc.ky.gov; Kevin.Bratcher@lrc.ky.gov; Regina.Bunch@lrc.ky.gov; Tom.Burch@lrc.ky.gov; Dan.Seum@lrc.ky.gov; Joe.Fischer@lrc.ky.gov; Kelly.Flood@lrc.ky.gov; Morgan.McGarvey@lrc.ky.gov; Alice.Kerr@lrc.ky.gov; Bob.Leeper@lrc.ky.gov; Brent.Yonts@lrc.ky.gov; Susan.Westrom@lrc.ky.gov; David.Watkins@lrc.ky.gov; Jim.Stewart@lrc.ky.gov; Tommy.Thompson@lrc.ky.gov; John.Tilley@lrc.ky.gov; Tommy.Turner@lrc.ky.gov; Myron.Dossett@lrc.ky.gov; Leslie.Combs@lrc.ky.gov; Dwight.Butler@lrc.ky.gov; John.Carney@lrc.ky.gov; Larry.Clark@lrc.ky.gov; Leslie.Combs@lrc.ky.gov

    This issue was submitted by Robin Rider-Osborne, Lexington, KY.

    Latest Post

    Friday’s UN Attack On America – 17 Global Goals To Seize America’s Wealth – Sustainable Development Agenda 21 Style


    Posted on September 26, 2015 by Rick Wells in Agenda 21,

     

    283 un massacre 940

     

    To those unfamiliar with the UN’s global government attack on freedom, capitalism and the United States, the ambiguous term “sustainable development” doesn’t have much meaning. It’s deliberately vague and can mean pretty much anything anyone chooses. Under the UN it means a “Nanny World” of global Marxism and austerity, with every person on the planet living at the same level of destitution and minimized resource consumption. To the degree that it is achieved by lifting up the poor, it’s equally dependent upon a corresponding degradation of the living standards of the more affluent.

    The people of the United States pay the nanny’s salary and all expenses, which are extremely hefty and burdensome. It is the opposite of the system we Americans have thrived under in the past and which the rest of the world, led by our own hijacked government, is now working feverishly to destroy.

    On Friday the anti-American global government, the United Nations, formally adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which they depict as a positive set of bold new Global Goals. It all depends upon which side of the equality equation one resides. For America and the West, it is a recipe for disaster, a hemlock cocktail that we didn’t order but which is being delivered to our table nonetheless, courtesy of the management; the global government cabal.

    In a ceremony at UN headquarters in New York City which opened the UN sustainable Development Summit, our chief protagonist, General Secretary Ban Ki-moon said, “The new agenda is a promise by leaders to all people everywhere. It is an agenda for people, to end poverty in all its forms – an agenda for the planet, our common home.” It’s an agenda for all nations to subordinate themselves to UN dictates, and to surrender their wealth for redistribution. Somehow those stark realities became lost in the midst of all the feel-good grand proclamations and naiveté, by design.

    It’s important to bear in mind while many of these vague and idealistic goals may seem worthwhile; most are completely unachievable, such as the first one below, and all come with a hefty price tag that must be paid by someone. That someone is the American people and our fellow Westerners. We, our nation and our way of life are under attack by the United Nations and by our government. It is an attack which, if allowed to proceed to its unnatural conclusion will be the end of us. That fact cannot be overstated. This is a takeover of the United States, our resources, our society and our sovereignty. We still have the power to say no, we can evict these global parasites and reclaim our sovereignty. All it requires is leadership, recognition of the threat and a sincere desire to preserve the greatest country on earth.

    If we fail to do so and they are successful in implementing this global agreement and enforcing it, America as we have known it will cease to exist. It’s that simple. The following seventeen goals are from the UN document, which can be viewed in its entirety here.

    Please note the unrealistic nature of the grand proclamations and goals, all intended to pull at the humanitarian heart strings and vilify those who resist the takeover as callous, uncaring and selfish. Pay attention to the insertion of central control in the UN over every aspect of our lives as Agenda 21 continues to be implemented without our approval and without any debate. It’s just being done, unilaterally, by those who have hijacked our government. The goals below are each linked to their original page on the UN website along with a short and in many cases disturbing excerpt of the UN’s own justification for their objectives.

    Also pay particular note to the objectives of economic development and equality. That money has to come from somewhere and as our standard of living is reduced we all become more equal. It’s also worth noting that climate change and “sustainable development” are prominently featured as a justification for everything, in spite of both terms having no real world relevance.

    Goal 1: END POVERTY IN ALL ITS FORMS EVERYWHERE

    Economic growth must be inclusive to provide sustainable jobs and promote equality.

    Goal 2: END HUNGER, ACHIEVE FOOD SECURITY AND IMPROVED NUTRITION AND PROMOTE SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE

    It is time to rethink how we grow, share and consume our food.

    If done right, agriculture, forestry and fisheries can provide nutritious food for all and generate decent incomes, while supporting people-centered rural development and protecting the environment.

    Right now, our soils, freshwater, oceans, forests and biodiversity are being rapidly degraded. Climate change is putting even more pressure on the resources we depend on, increasing risks associated with disasters such as droughts and floods.

    Goal 3: ENSURE HEALTHY LIVES AND PROMOTE WELL-BEING FOR ALL AT ALL AGES

    Ensuring healthy lives and promoting the well-being for all at all ages is essential to sustainable development.

    Goal 4: ENSURE INCLUSIVE AND QUALITY EDUCATION FOR ALL AND PROMOTE LIFELONG LEARNING

    Obtaining a quality education is the foundation to improving people’s lives and sustainable development.

    Goal 5: ACHIEVE GENDER EQUALITY AND EMPOWER ALL WOMEN AND GIRLS

    Providing women and girls with equal access to education, health care, decent work, and representation in political and economic decision-making processes will fuel sustainable economies and benefit societies and humanity at large.

    Goal 6: ENSURE ACCESS TO WATER AND SANITATION FOR ALL

    There is sufficient fresh water on the planet to achieve this. But due to bad economics or poor infrastructure, every year millions of people, most of them children, die from diseases associated with inadequate water supply, sanitation and hygiene.

    Goal 7: ENSURE ACCESS TO AFFORDABLE, RELIABLE, SUSTAINABLE AND MODERN ENERGY FOR ALL

    Energy is central to nearly every major challenge and opportunity the world faces today. Be it for jobs, security, climate change, food production or increasing incomes, access to energy for all is essential.

    Sustainable energy is opportunity – it transforms lives, economies and the planet.

    UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is leading a Sustainable Energy for All initiative to ensure universal access to modern energy services, improve efficiency and increase use of renewable sources.

    Goal 8: PROMOTE INCLUSIVE AND SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC GROWTH, EMPLOYMENT AND DECENT WORK FOR ALL

    A continued lack of decent work opportunities, insufficient investments and under-consumption lead to an erosion of the basic social contract underlying democratic societies: that all must share in progress.

    Sustainable economic growth will require societies to create the conditions that allow people to have quality jobs that stimulate the economy while not harming the environment.

    Goal 9: BUILD RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE, PROMOTE SUSTAINABLE INDUSTRIALIZATION AND FOSTER INNOVATION

    Investments in infrastructure – transport, irrigation, energy and information and communication technology – are crucial to achieving sustainable development and empowering communities in many countries.

    Inclusive and sustainable industrial development is the primary source of income generation, allows for rapid and sustained increases in living standards for all people, [except Westerners] and provides the technological solutions to environmentally sound industrialization.

    Goal 10: REDUCE INEQUALITY WITHIN AND AMONG COUNTRIES

    There is growing consensus that economic growth is not sufficient to reduce poverty if it is not inclusive and if it does not involve the three dimensions of sustainable development – economic, social and environmental.

    To reduce inequality, policies should be universal in principle paying attention to the needs of disadvantaged and marginalized populations.

    Goal 11: MAKE CITIES INCLUSIVE, SAFE, RESILIENT AND SUSTAINABLE

    However, many challenges exist to maintaining cities in a way that continues to create jobs and prosperity while not straining land and resources.

    The challenges cities face can be overcome in ways that allow them to continue to thrive and grow, while improving resource use and reducing pollution and poverty.

    Goal 12: ENSURE SUSTAINABLE CONSUMPTION AND PRODUCTION PATTERNS

    Sustainable consumption and production is about promoting resource and energy efficiency, sustainable infrastructure, and providing access to basic services, green and decent jobs and a better quality of life for all [Again, not the Americans or Westerners – We’re paying the bill but excluded from the investments]. Its implementation helps to achieve overall development plans, reduce future economic, environmental and social costs, strengthen economic competitiveness and reduce poverty.

    Sustainable consumption and production aims at “doing more and better with less,” increasing net welfare gains from economic activities by reducing resource use.

    It also requires a systemic approach and cooperation among actors operating in the supply chain… engaging consumers through awareness-raising and education on sustainable consumption and lifestyles, providing consumers with adequate information through standards and labels and engaging in sustainable public procurement.

    Goal 13: TAKE URGENT ACTION TO COMBAT CLIMATE CHANGE AND ITS IMPACTS

    Climate change is now affecting every country on every continent. It is disrupting national economies and affecting lives, costing people, communities and countries dearly today and even more tomorrow.

    People are experiencing the significant impacts of climate change, which include changing weather patterns, rising sea level, and more extreme weather events. [More of the usual false alarmist claims are in the original text] The poorest and most vulnerable people are being affected the most.

    [Here’s their “justification” for requiring worldwide participation by every nation and the ability to control every country.]But climate change is a global challenge that does not respect national borders. Emissions anywhere affect people everywhere. It is an issue that requires solutions that need to be coordinated at the international level and it requires international cooperation to help developing countries move toward a low-carbon economy. To address climate change, countries are working to adopt a global agreement in Paris this December.

    Goal 14: CONSERVE AND SUSTAINABLY USE THE OCEANS, SEAS AND MARINE RESOURCES

    Careful management of this essential global resource is a key feature of a sustainable future.

    Goal 15: SUSTAINABLY MANAGE FORESTS, COMBAT DESERTIFICATION, HALT AND REVERSE LAND DEGRADATION, HALT BIODIVERSITY LOSS

    Deforestation and desertification – caused by human activities and climate change – pose major challenges to sustainable development and have affected the lives and livelihoods of millions of people in the fight against poverty.

    Goal 16: PROMOTE JUST, PEACEFUL AND INCLUSIVE SOCIETIES

    …dedicated to the promotion of peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, the provision of access to justice for all, and building effective, accountable institutions at all levels.

    Goal 17: REVITALIZE THE GLOBAL PARTNERSHIP FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    A successful sustainable development agenda requires partnerships between governments, the private sector and civil society. [Money going in every direction from a web of sources makes it much harder to track and much more lucrative.]

    Urgent action is needed to mobilize, redirect and unlock the transformative power of trillions of dollars of private resources to deliver on sustainable development objectives. Long-term investments, including foreign direct investment, are needed in critical sectors, especially in developing countries. [Where few see the fraud and those that do are often in on it]

    It isn’t hard to figure out who will be left out of the benefits when all of this new inclusiveness and “sustainable” everything is being created. Just as the foreigners are now being given preference within the United States for everything soon foreign nations will be given the advantage. We can only imagine, since it hasn’t yet been revealed, just how much of this type of outrageous and destructive anti-Americanism is hidden in Obamatrade.

    As hard as it was being pushed by the criminals in the executive branch and the legislature, in conjunction with foreign commissions, we can be certain that it is not a benefit to the American people. There is no good news in this declaration for the American people, just more of the same anti-Americanism, much of it at the hands of our own “leadership.”

    I’m Rick Wells – a conservative writer who recognizes that our nation, our Constitution and our traditions are under a full scale assault from multiple threats. I’m not PC; I call it like I see it. – Please “Like” him on Facebook, “Follow” him on Twitter or visit www.rickwells.us & www.truthburgers

    http://rickwells.us/fridays-un-attack-on-america-17-global-goals-to-seize-americas-wealth-sustainable-development-agenda-21-style/

    HEALTH, Latest Post

    Reflections: Neurology and the Humanities, Caring for Maggie


     

     

    Sara M. Schaefer, MD

    1. Correspondence to Dr. Schaefer: sara.schaefer@yale.edu
    1. doi: http:/​/​dx.​doi.​org/​10.​1212/​WNL.​0000000000001836 Neurology August 11, 2015 vol. 85 no. 6 553-554

      Finally, a real person to talk to me.

      “Hello, I’m Dr. Larson. Are you a

      family member of Ms. Brown?”

      I hope the nurse is paying

      attention to her blood pressures.

      “I’m Bill, Maggie’s husband.”

      Please tell me she’s going to be OK.

      “It’s nice to meet you, Mr. Brown,

      although I’m sorry it is under these

      circumstances. I’m an intensive care

      doctor who is caring for your wife.

      What do you know so far about why

      she’s here?”

      How do I tell you that she’s not

      going to be OK?

      “Our neighbor told me she found her on the

      ground and called 911. That’s pretty much all I know.”

      I’m not ready. I’m not ready for this.

      “Unfortunately it is very serious.

      I’m so sorry to tell you that your

      wife has had major bleeding in

      her brain.”

      I’m sorry that I have to break your heart.

      “How could this have happened? I just saw her this morning.”

      Why didn’t I call her at lunch. If only I’d checked on her, this never would

      have happened.

      “These things happen all of a sudden.

      It’s no one’s fault.”

      You remind me so much of my father.

      I can see him sitting here, as devastated

      and bewildered as you are. He would be lost.

      “Is she going to be OK?”

      Why isn’t my son here? He would know

      what to do.

      “I’m afraid it’s a large amount of

      bleeding. There is significant

      damage to the brain.”

      If only I could save her.

      “Well, can’t you stop the bleeding

      somehow? Take the blood out?”

      I don’t understand.

      “The bleeding likely has stopped,

      but will continue to cause problems

      because of swelling of her brain inside

      her skull. If she survives, she will likely

      be severely disabled.”

      I can see her in a coma in a month,

      with a trach and feeding tube, warding

      off her third pneumonia.

      “So what do we do now? There must be

      something you can do.”

      I refuse to let this be the end.

      “We can go in a few directions. We can

      be very aggressive with her care, which

      may keep her alive, but won’t reverse the

      large amount of injury that has already

      occurred. Or we can focus on her comfort.”

      I don’t want to break her ribs with CPR.

      That’s no way to die.

      “Do everything you can.”

      You’re giving up on her. I can feel it.

      “Have you ever had a conversation

      with your wife about what she would

      want in this type of situation? Does she

      have a living will?”

      If only you knew how peaceful comfort

      can be, in the end. For her and for you.

      “No. I don’t know.”

      We never talked about these things.

      It was too scary.

      “The important thing is to focus on

      what she would want.”

      He doesn’t understand.

      “Please save my wife.”

      Miracles happen every day. Please God

      send a miracle.

      “We’ll do everything we can for her.”

      I wish I could give her peace.

       

       

      Footnotes

      • Listen to Dr. Schaefer read this poem, available on the iPad® and Android devices.

      • © 2015 American Academy of Neurology

      CONTINUE READING….